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vitoman
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Quote vitoman Replybullet Topic: Landmaster Rotary Hoe MK 1
    Posted: 01 Jun 2010 at 10:51pm
Hi to all. Just found this site and just bought this, paid too much - NEVER EVER go on e**y after a few bevvies - still its here now

Taken just after I blasted it with the pressure washer







I wouldn't have thought that wouldmake for a good spark!!


I thought the g/box was seized until I freed off that handle with the black knob, and got it out of gear


Aaaaah!!! No exhaust/silencer, and broken studs


So far I have had the top off and seen all the chains inside, needs a good clean (reminds me of the "black death" from '70's cars, have freed off a lever which appears to seperate the wheels from the g/box.
The exhaust is missing and studs broken.
Although I have removed and replaced the 'plug, the thread is not too good.
The engine turns over freely, and with 'plug removed I can feel some compression (but not much), dont know if there's a spark. Does it have a magneto, coil or what makes the spark?
The fuel tank is full of brown crud, as I expect is the carb.
So, engine, g/box, and clutch are unknowns at this time.
Any info on what engine it has, how it works, where I can get a manual etc would be much appreciated.............OH and where do I start!!! Cheers and thanks for the site.
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bryandenham
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Quote bryandenham Replybullet Posted: 10 Jul 2010 at 9:40pm
hiya, I'm just rebuilding a MK1 and its interesting to see that there are a few little differences between yours and mine.

bryan D
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vitoman
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Quote vitoman Replybullet Posted: 11 Jul 2010 at 12:04pm
Have you got any photos?
So far I know, g/box and clutch appear okay..........but .......no spark!!!, I have removed the engine cover and the starter pulley, but to get at the points etc I have to remove a screw.........yup absolutely solidAngryI haven't decided how I'm going to remove it yet, dont really want to drill it, and I have yet to find a way of locking the engine to help in removal, so for now i'm stuck. Also has a snapped nut/bolt whatever on one side of the tine cover, Not sure about the exhaust studs either. any suggestions appreciated

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sten
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Quote sten Replybullet Posted: 11 Jul 2010 at 1:14pm
Hi, an impact driver would be a good investment for stubbon screws and heat from a small blowlamp realy helps too. The broken exhaust stud that has part sticking out could come with heat and molegrips but the flush stud will have to be drilled and tapped.
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bryandenham
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Quote bryandenham Replybullet Posted: 11 Jul 2010 at 3:08pm
sorry I haven't sorted out this electronic lark as far as photos go but 1. the drive cover to the rotors is different and mine is embossed with 'Landmaster'. You have a cover over the clutch arm. you have a cover on the opposite side of the clutch arm. the wheels are different. location of the drive wheel dog clutch lever is different. the carb and air cleaner is different. There is no guard on the front of mine. The data plate def. says MK 1 and the villiers engine is a mk 20 and it runs!!! I have to fabricate a complete chassis side but all the mechanics seem serviceable and just need stripping, cleaning and re building. I'm struggling to remove the wheels, a hydraulic puller and lots of heat and they still haven't budged!
cheers, Bry D
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Jimmy C
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Quote Jimmy C Replybullet Posted: 13 Jul 2010 at 4:33am
Hi Fellas,
I am also in the process of restoring a Landmaster Mark 1, Not that I am in need of it, I already have a hoe/tiller be it rather a small one, Much smaller than the Landmaster but like the Landmaster it was built to last the test of time, Not to mention the abuse.
The fact is, In all honesty and with hand on heart, The moment I set eyes on the Landmaster I was totally and utterly head over heels smitten, Need went out of the window to be replaced by pure unadulterated want with a capital W, I get like that with machinery, I tend to look at an old machine the same way someone would look at the latest model car, Others who share the same passion for all quality things machinery will know exactly what I mean.
Anyway enough of my old mans ramblings and what gets me exited.
It seems there are differences with all three machines, My machine is the same as Vitoman's machine with a few exceptions to detail such as: My wheels bolt onto three legged hubs, The final drive to rotor shaft cover does not have panel sculpturing at the bottom end of the panel and the manufactures plate has no mention of a patent or patent number, other than that both machines marry up.
Bryan's machine on the other hand has quite a lot of structural differences such as clutch, clutch lever and various other covers omitted, As well as no front protection plate, Although that could be because it is missing, A quick look under the engine bed would determine this, Look for two holes in parallel front to back and of about 5/8th to 11/16th.
During my research into the Landmaster MK 1 & 2 ( that mostly drew a blank ) I recall another machine that looked like the rotary hoe and made by the same manufacturer but was in fact a fully fledged rotovator, It's model name evades me at this time but I will research it again, Interestingly it was also designated MK 1 status, Perhaps you could let me know the length of the tines on your machine Bryan, That would be a good indicator as the digging depth of the rotary hoe is only 1/12 to 2 inches, It's a mechanical HOE remember, But boy what a hoe.
How are you getting on with the flush exhaust stud Vitoman? Try drilling a hole through the centre of the stud, Apply some heat then use a stud extractor to remove it.
On my next post I will make known the setbacks I have had with my machine, I say setbacks as problems are things that are unsolvable.
On that note I will say Goodnight. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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bryandenham
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Quote bryandenham Replybullet Posted: 13 Jul 2010 at 7:21pm
hiya, the tines on my machine are 4""
There is a small 'top hat' cover on the clutch shaft opposite the clutch arm.
There are no extraneous holes that suggest any other fittings.
I am still having difficulty getting the wheels off which are keyed directly to the axle, a bit more heat and a bigger hydraulic puller may work but I don't want to break a wheel.
I haven't found tyres yet but I'll keep trying, I think they are 10x3 but don't really know till I can see the back of the tyre.
I have a small collection of rotovator/cultivators and have just finished a 1976 B6000 Kubota, scrap when I started and now spot on.
I did hear that Howards are rotovators and everything else is a cultivator!
All the best from the Isle of Man. Bry.D
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bryandenham
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Quote bryandenham Replybullet Posted: 13 Jul 2010 at 7:24pm
ps to my post, I have a couple of origonal adverts and there were three models current in the early 50s.
Bry.D.
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Jimmy C
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Quote Jimmy C Replybullet Posted: 14 Jul 2010 at 2:59am
Hi Bryan,
 
By the sounds of it you could have a Landmaster Kestrel MK 1.
 
Unfortunately very little, If any at all, End user material exists with regard to the Landmaster range of machines, User handbooks and/or workshop manuals are unheard of, Which is probably why they don't enjoy a greater following, Hence the rather thin scattering of these beautiful machines.
 
I didn't realise that the wheels on your particular machine were directly keyed to the Axle as opposed to the hubs being keyed to the axle, Now I can see the full picture of your dilemma, Try copious amounts of silicone spray as well as a few sharp taps with a hammer to help loosen the rust, Do this twice in one day then again the following morning, Apply heat to the wheel ( not the axle ) allow to cool down, Repeat the tapping with the hammer, Silicone spray, Apply heat to the wheel as before then try your hub puller while the wheel is still hot, If it is possible to also get silicone on the axle behind the wheel do so, If this proves difficult try putting drinking straws together to use as an extension tube, This process has worked for me many times in the past when separating rusted together key and tapper parts.
 
Why do you have to fabricate a full side of the machines main body? Is it damaged or rusted through? Damage can be heated up and panel beaten flat again, A bad rust scab or hole can be chopped out, New metal of the same thickness slipped in, Held in place with magnets and welded both sides, With the face welding ground flat on completion ready for prep and spraying.
 
What state are your chain tensioner wheels in? All four of mine are down to the metal with what appears to be weak springs as well, I'm having a tough time matching them up at the moment, The roller wheels are 52mm dia, 24mm wide and take a 6mm central pin, The central pins I'm not really concerned about as the carriers are 44mm wide with plenty of scope for thicker pins if necessary, Inside the final drive to rotor shaft casing there is another chain tensioner that I am not happy with, It is metal and mounts on two pins one of which is the adjuster, there is no evidence of any other tensioner material other than the metal, So I may employ the use of a floating chain tensioner on that one.
 
With reference to Rotovator, Rotavator and Cultivator we are going into one of those grey areas where the Purists, The I don't knows and the I don't cares always seem to be locked into great debate, The fact is, If you line up a dozen people and ask what the difference is between them you would undoubtedly receive a dozen different answers, In my opinion and what I have always understood to be correct is as follows: The word Rotavator was coined by Mr Howard, That wonderful man who is reputed to have set the ball rolling, From that comes the word Rotovator which is now generally used to describe anything that is not Howard, A Cultivator could meen anything from a stick with a blade used to cultivate the earth, To a person using an implement to do the same thing, Thereby becoming the cultivator himself/herself as in gardener, farmer or agriculturist.
 
Something to ponder on Eh, But the question you must ask yourself is: Is it worth your time to do so?, ( Guess what stable I come from )
 
Kind regards, Jim.
 
 
 
 
 
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bryandenham
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Quote bryandenham Replybullet Posted: 14 Jul 2010 at 7:45pm
hiya Jim,
doing all those things, the wheel will come off soon enough but I'm just a little worried about it cracking.
Got NO chain tensioners, the only adjustment is on the gearbox which slides with an adjusting screw.
Yes, I am letting plates into the rotten side, a couple of 6x3s will do and a couple of smaller pieces.
There is a locking bolt, not grub screw on the wheels so fortunately with that vertical and removed the plus gas can penetrate the centre of the wheel, I also use a diesel/lithium mix which seems to help after the hammer/ heat and penetrating oil.
The rotovator/ cultivator comment was very tongue in cheek, I think like you. I prefer machines with a patina of use including modifications made from the previous users.
I have a 1946 small lathe that I aquired from a steam enthusiast that would interest you, the lathe not the steam enthusiast.

Hey, I've just been given a Raleigh bicycle, the old upright one with the oil bath chaincase. I,ve only been working on the owner for eleven years, persistence pays!!

all the best, Bry.D.
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Jimmy C
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Quote Jimmy C Replybullet Posted: 15 Jul 2010 at 12:25am
Hi Bryan,
 
Lets hope you can get that wheel off without any damage to it, I take it the rim is cast, If it is, Gently Gently regardless of the man hours.
 
The lathe sounds good, What make is it, Did it come with tooling and more importantly is it in-true, If it was used regular it will have that machine oil smell to it.....even better.
 
I can't quite place the bicycle, Is that the motorized one with the JAP engine?.
 
Are you sure you haven't got chain tensioners inside the Landmaster, They are deep down inside the machine under the chains, I must admit I didn't see them, As big as they are, Until I took all the covers off and cleaned everything up with engine degreaser, They are now out of the machine along with the carriers awaiting renewal, If I can source them.
 
Keep me informed on that wheel Bry.
 
Kind regards and best wishes,  Jim.
 
 
 
 
 
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bryandenham
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Quote bryandenham Replybullet Posted: 16 Jul 2010 at 7:11pm
hiya Jim,
definitely NO chain adjusters and no provision either, no bolt holes etc.
Engine number 116A17853A. Villiers Mk. 20.
Landmaster No. A81327.
Lathe is a J.F.Stringer. Express Works,orleston Rd, London,N7. Number 546.....Brill. website on the net.
Slight, (total), error on the 'bike!! It's actually a Golden Sunbeam circa 1932. The Raleigh description was off the guy I had it off. I'm delighted that its a Sunbeam, loads of info on the 'net'. Its quality is unbelievable and the brakes are unusual to put it mildly, a mixture of rod/ stirrup/and caliper!!!!!! and origonal. It has never been restored and still has a two speed villiers hub and a twist grip gear control and do you know, I actually rode it yesterday, talk about a smooth ride. Its quite rusty but totally complete and serviceable so a good service and a full coat of clear waxoyl and I shall use it as a daily rider! I've found that waxoyl is a great preserver of patina, our Willys Jeep is still in its ww11 paint plus a coat of waxoyl, it retains its dents, rubbed of and scuffed finish, great.
Oh yes, the lathe smells superb. Most of my friends have old, old engineering machines and old, old trucks, tractors etc, including horse tack, a paradise of nasal experience.
Enough, back to the wheel.
all the best. Bry.D.
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Jimmy C
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Quote Jimmy C Replybullet Posted: 17 Jul 2010 at 2:03am
Hi Bryan,
 
I'm totally confused with regard to your Landmaster, As a matter of interest does it have one or two wheels?, I already know that a wheel won't come off but I took it that the other wheel came off easily, Like it was when I took the hubs off mine, One was a piece of cake, However the other was an absolute pig.
 
I still have difficulties locating new chain tensioner wheels and the last thing I want is to resort to plan B, That would involve substituting with modern alternatives, As it stands they may have to be reproduced as specials, Or maybe the existing ones refinished, I will give it a few more months of searching before I decide.
 
The other thing I am toying with is replacing the Villiers engine with a Petter AB1 diesel engine, This is an engine I fully rebuilt some time ago and mounted a new 3.5 KVA generator pack on the back end, As I no longer need a generator I was thinking of using the engine on the Landmaster, This I know will open a can of worms with regard to the engineering side of fitting, Apart from the lowering ( and possibly altering the dimensions ) of the engine bed there are lots of areas that require careful consideration, Not least the extra torque on the Albion gearbox and the extra front end weight, What do you think??? Am I mad, Or will the brilliantly engineered Petter diesel engine be an ideal complement to the brilliantly engineered Landmaster?, That's how I see it.
 
Is the Stringer lathe sited and running yet? I bet it's a far cry from one of these modern things.
 
Your going to have to post a photo or two of the Sunbeam if only for prosperity on the site, There won't be many of them around after 78 years, And it still works, Bryan that has just got to be a full restoration job with every stage catalogued and photographed, It's alright giving it a rub over with Waxoyl but with something as old as that there is a likelihood of it rotting from the inside out, Don't risk it, Sympathetically restored it would become of interest to both collectors and museums.
 
Kind regards and best wishes,  Jim.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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bryandenham
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Quote bryandenham Replybullet Posted: 17 Jul 2010 at 10:15am
hiya jim,
yes, the Landmaster has two wheels and no they are both proving VERY difficult to get off. As they are cast I'm being very careful. At least one has to come of to repair the side frame.
The Landmaster looks very similar to the pictured one but with the differences I have said.
I am off to Denmark now for a couple of weeks so won't be posting for a while.
The lathe is up and running with a seperate period motor of course. It is quite small, like a large model makers one, ideal for bushes etc.
I will at some point learn to create images for the forum , maybe.
Don't know about the Petter, I've used one on a large Howard but I consider the Landmaster to be a bit fragile for a diesel however I stand to be corrected by them what knows.
If you can't get any tensioners I would try to copy the origonals, maybe using modern materials where they cannot be seen. or where they can be disguised. Some modern things are okay you know.
Well we are off now in our 1987 Mercedes motor home, still going strong after 23years and lookin' fine.

Hope to hear from you when we get back.

All the best Bryan D.
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bryandenham
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Quote bryandenham Replybullet Posted: 17 Jul 2010 at 10:48am
Jim, Jim, Jim, check out this month's 'Old Tractor'. Page 26. Byron TRACTOR with a Ford 10 Engine!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Same firm that made the Landmaster!
Want one.
Bryan D.
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vitoman
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Quote vitoman Replybullet Posted: 17 Jul 2010 at 5:13pm
What type of impact driver do you guys use, in the "good old days" I had one that you wacked with a hammer, sounds a bit harsh, I see now there are electric ones.....but at a cost!!!
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Jimmy C
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Quote Jimmy C Replybullet Posted: 17 Jul 2010 at 10:31pm
Hi Vitoman,
 
The good old days, Whack it one with a hammer is the type I use on stubborn screws, Providing that the screw head has not been excessively chewed up, If it is chewed up it will require drilling 3.5 to 4mm dia, Use plenty of WD40 then use a star bit in the impact driver, If it still remains stubborn try heat, WD40 and then the impact driver, The use of heat Must be applied to the surrounding area and NOT the screw, The aim is to expand the metal that the screw goes into.
 
Another method I use where the screw head is still intact is to apply heat, Then a few squirts of WD, Place a sturdy screwdriver on the screw and give it a few sharp taps with a hammer, Then unscrew,  Hope this helps.
 
Kind regards and best wishes,  Jim.
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Quote hunter Replybullet Posted: 20 Jul 2010 at 12:59pm
That is a bit of electric fencing ungroung wire on the spark plug! That will work then!
 
As to locking the engine stick a bit of rope down the spark plug hole and turn the engine over until it gets stuck, you can undo the screw without damaging the engine.
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Quote enginear Replybullet Posted: 21 Jul 2010 at 7:37pm
any broken stud that is broken flush or below surface can be removed by using a good stud remover mine came from snap-on these are fluted,drills are supplied in kit after a hole biggest poss tap in a small way the correct remover then gently remove with mole grips keep doing this until the remover goes in a fair way making sure to follow the same grooves made each time in the stud then use heat the best is oxy/ace cool with water until cold then tap in stud remover and using the correct adapter undo broken stud warning do not heat stud before drilling this hardens it making it much more difficult to remove if a stud is protruding fit a nut over it and electric weld it to stud and again cool with water when cold remove with a spanner the times to be carefull is if its ally, or cast iron as this will crack if heated and cooled with water another tip use only a spray made to ease rusty bolts and nuts most of others are a lubricant
simple
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Quote bryandenham Replybullet Posted: 30 Jul 2010 at 7:36pm
Hi Guys, back from Denmark and guess what? I've gone and bought another Landmaster. I've been after it for a while because it is one owner and although well worked and with a patina of rust it has always been under cover and well maintained. It appears to be exactly the same model that I already have so the first one may become a donor, we'll see. Hope eve. catch y'all soon. Bry D.ryone is well
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Quote cromponz Replybullet Posted: 14 Aug 2010 at 9:15pm
Can't help but butt in here with a suggestion or two.
The Villiers engine.... ignition. First ascertain if there is any spark - ground the s/plug and turn the engine over. Lack of spark is quite common.
The points are located behind the flywheel. To remove the flywheel (on the Landmaster) first remove the cup on the PTO side of the engine. The now exposed shaft has a flat section which enables you to clamp with a decent wrench. (2 man operation). Then use a decent socket and bar lever on the flywheel nut and wind off. It will be very tight. The nut will pull the flywheel off, which is on a tapered crankshaft.
Once the flywheel is removed, you will see a small plate that has a leaf spring bracket holding it in place, move the lever to the side and the plate is able to be removed. A small matter of undoing the wiring and the points will be able to be remove in two pieces. Caution..... look carefully and don't lose the tension spring or any of the fibre insulating washers.
 
A lack of compression is also common these old dears. Sitting for years they are often exposed to the elements. Consequently the valves are in poor condition. Remove the head, extract the valves and inspect the valve faces and seats. You can expect to see pitted valve seats which will require recutting and valves refacing.
That should keep you occupied for an afternoon.
Oh! regarding the chain tensioners. Why not utilise that nylon material they use for bushings. A local engineering shop will have blank material and you can spin it down on a lathe.
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Quote Charlie Replybullet Posted: 15 Aug 2010 at 9:57am
Another problem with the Villiers magneto is the fact the back plate is aluminium. This forms a very hard layer of oxide over time, so when stripping the mag give all the metal to metal surfaces a good clean to remove the oxide layer. The earth return is via the back plate so any oxide can create a high resistance or disconnection in this path. Read this in an old copy of Stationary Engine magazine. 
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Quote cromponz Replybullet Posted: 15 Aug 2010 at 11:41am
You're quite right about the oxidation but I forgot to mention previously that the condensor is also located behind the mounting plate. If the points are pitted then it is an indication that the condensor needs replacing. If the points are good then a simple hone and reassemble.
Oh! on reassembling you will need to retime the ignition. There is no keyway to align things but it's fairly easy to do.
Stamped into the flywheel is a small arrow. Clean the alloy backing plate and you will find a corresponding arrow. Thes must be aligned when the piston is at T.D.C. (Top dead centre).
When the flywheel is fully tightened in this position then you can gap the points at .020". It's a bit fidley but when the points are set then you can fit the small points protector plate.
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Quote Jimmy C Replybullet Posted: 15 Aug 2010 at 10:51pm
Hi Cromponz,
 
Thanks for the bushings material tip, If only everything in life was so simple!!!
 
The chain tensioners and their carriers are purpose made with the exception of the offending tensioner wheels, Which at the time of manufacture where probably readily available and used by other manufacturers for other items of machinery.
 
The tensioner wheels are of steel construction with central bearings, The shape of the steel structure resembles a narrow bobbin that has been filled and bonded with a hard wearing Nylon material, The size of each wheel is 2 1/4" diameter x 1" thick, The centre hole with bearings is 5/16".
 
I am still searching for replacements and the last resort is to pass them to a company for re-bonding.
 
My regards to all,  Jim.
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Quote cromponz Replybullet Posted: 17 Aug 2010 at 1:26pm
We have just removed one of these wonderful machines from our workbench today. The customer has yet to pick it up.
 
Someone mentioned tyres. We were advised that the 300x10x2ply are no longer available. So we fitted 400x10x4ply tyres. They are larger in diameter so it necessitated fitting 105mm spacers on one wheel to gain clearance from a coverplate.
 
Regarding your tensioners, I know exactly what you are talking about, had a good look at them yesterday. If I was you, I would use the original brackets and tensioning springs but cut out the centre section and substitute that with nylon material.
On Friday we found a problem with the tynes slipping or failing to drive when under load. A bonded rubber joint (chain driven) had seperated from one of the mounting plates. We took the machine apart and removed this large joint (125mm x 25mm) Parts are non existant but we found a product which rebonded the two back together and it is now functioning as new. The product is Loctite 480. It's ideal for any anti-vib mount.
 
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Quote Jimmy C Replybullet Posted: 18 Aug 2010 at 10:22pm

Hi Cromponz,

I see what you mean about the Nylon material, It's an interesting idea that may just work, I fear though that the central pin would wear down the Nylon hole rather quickly, However if I where to bush the center of the Nylon with tight fitting small bore tubing of hardened steel and make new pins out of the same type of steel I may be in with a fighting chance, I will certainly look into that possibility in more depth, Thank you for your input.
 
I take it that your faulty joint was on the sprocket side of the rotor shaft, This is the one part of the machine that I inspected and decided to leave intact, Now that you have identified a potential weak spot in that area I will strip it out completely for a closer look.
 
Kind regards and best wishes,  Jim.
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Quote cromponz Replybullet Posted: 24 Aug 2010 at 11:52am
I think the nylon would wear fairly well. In New Zealand we have a couple of lawnmower manufacturers who use a nylon flat shoe as a chain tensioner. I've been servicing lawnmowers & chainsaw for over 30 years and these parts have worn very well. But your thoughts regarding sleeving it with a hardened material certainly has merit. Have a look at a gudgeon pin from a small chainsaw. You must have a cobber who works in a lawnmower/chainsaw shop. Then use a long shaft cap screw, they are a fairly hard material and readily available.
Just a suggestion Jim, don't overlook the seal inside the final drive to the tines. We spent many hours on the machine in the workshop and it works brilliantly but when we filled the chaincase, to our dismay the oil began a seeping on the floor.
We haven't been in the area at all so there are no guilt trips. I put the proposition of stripping down and replacing the seal to the customer but he has deferred further expense for a while.
But  I'm sure you wouldn't overlook a simple thing like that.
 
Stick with it mate, she'll look a real pearler when you're finished.
Dave
 
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Quote vitoman Replybullet Posted: 24 Sep 2010 at 6:03pm
Originally posted by cromponz

Can't help but butt in here with a suggestion or two.
The Villiers engine.... ignition. First ascertain if there is any spark - ground the s/plug and turn the engine over. Lack of spark is quite common.
The points are located behind the flywheel. To remove the flywheel (on the Landmaster) first remove the cup on the PTO side of the engine. The now exposed shaft has a flat section which enables you to clamp with a decent wrench. (2 man operation). Then use a decent socket and bar lever on the flywheel nut and wind off. It will be very tight. The nut will pull the flywheel off, which is on a tapered crankshaft.
Once the flywheel is removed, you will see a small plate that has a leaf spring bracket holding it in place, move the lever to the side and the plate is able to be removed. A small matter of undoing the wiring and the points will be able to be remove in two pieces. Caution..... look carefully and don't lose the tension spring or any of the fibre insulating washers.
 


There's defoo no spark so I've started to take it apart.
Is this the "nut" you refer to?? The one in the middle or the small screw. Which way do I turn it? and does the screw have to be removed first? The screw is a real PITA, I have managedt to loosen it enough to turn back and to about 1/8 th of a turn, but no more, whacked it with an impact driver which got it moving, and have soaked it with release oil, but no more movement



The points.



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lawnmowerboy
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Quote lawnmowerboy Replybullet Posted: 24 Sep 2010 at 7:04pm
that screw is nothing to do with removing the flywheel
most probarbly an adjuster of some sort

the big nut in the center is a nut to hold it on and pull it off
it will come loose
turn about half a turn
go tight
then keep turning it and ittl pull the flywheel off itself

hope this helps


will
Grow old, not up!!!
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vitoman
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Quote vitoman Replybullet Posted: 24 Sep 2010 at 7:12pm
Originally posted by lawnmowerboy

that screw is nothing to do with removing the flywheel
most probarbly an adjuster of some sort

the big nut in the center is a nut to hold it on and pull it off
it will come loose
turn about half a turn
go tight
then keep turning it and ittl pull the flywheel off itself

hope this helps


will


Okay thats great many thanks, is it normal thread not l/hand or anything stupid.
Cheers Gaz.
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lawnmowerboy
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Quote lawnmowerboy Replybullet Posted: 24 Sep 2010 at 8:06pm
nope just normal
Grow old, not up!!!
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Charlie
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Quote Charlie Replybullet Posted: 24 Sep 2010 at 8:06pm
Normal rh thread.
Those points look like they could do with a good clean with sand paper, try that before removing flywheel.
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cromponz
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Quote cromponz Replybullet Posted: 24 Sep 2010 at 8:41pm

I don't like to disagree but poking around in there trying to clean the points will not be satisfactory.

The photo of the ignition box looks shocking. I would suggest proceeding with removal of the flywheel. You may find it easier if you remove the round domed plate on the other side of the machine. Removal of that plate exposes an extension shaft which is connected to the crankshaft.
Get your cobber to hold onto that with a decent spanner while you swing on the flywheel nut.
Don't be afraid to use some very big spanners.
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vitoman
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Quote vitoman Replybullet Posted: 24 Sep 2010 at 9:22pm
Originally posted by cromponz

I don't like to disagree but poking around in there trying to clean the points will not be satisfactory.

The photo of the ignition box looks shocking. I would suggest proceeding with removal of the flywheel. You may find it easier if you remove the round domed plate on the other side of the machine. Removal of that plate exposes an extension shaft which is connected to the crankshaft.
Get your cobber to hold onto that with a decent spanner while you swing on the flywheel nut.
Don't be afraid to use some very big spanners.


About what I thought. already taken cover off crank.... no nut, but there is a flat on the shaft, so hopefully a pair of shifters, one either side and it should come off..........putting it back together.........that'll be another story I'm sure.
Thanks for the advice guys.
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andrew ford
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Quote andrew ford Replybullet Posted: 24 Sep 2010 at 9:22pm
dont forget hammers as you always need hammers close by when restoreing old villiers!!!! but on another hand you dont big spanners and hammers to restore jap engines tuff as old  boots japs but there is nothing wrong with villiers.
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