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DevonNewbie
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Quote DevonNewbie Replybullet Topic: Allen Scythe
    Posted: 08 Apr 2011 at 10:14pm

Hi All

Here is my Allen Scythe. I thought is was a model T but after reading 70OGM again it suggests that it might be a MkII. (can any confirm what model it is?). I have been meaning to add my project here for a while. Inspired by the new forum I thought I would start.

I purchased it off THAT web site at the end of August 2009. This is the first machine I have brought to renovate. My intention was to get it working so I could use it to cut the weeds that were over 3 foot tall in our orchard. I had previously hire a power scythe (once a year) to attack the weeds but it was costing more than 80 for a weekend, so I hoped this would be a cheaper and more interested idea. Armed with a downloaded copy of the model TS work instruction, a few old spanners and some misplaced hope, I though it was worth a try.


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DevonNewbie
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Quote DevonNewbie Replybullet Posted: 08 Apr 2011 at 10:22pm

When I collected it I was quite please to say it fitted in the back of my estate car without any problems. I just had to remove the handle bars and I was away. Unfortunately I didn't mark the position of the handle bars so on reassembly I couldn't get the clutch to work. So I opened up the gear box to have a look.


It could hardly be simpler.

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Quote DevonNewbie Replybullet Posted: 08 Apr 2011 at 10:35pm

On collection the vendor told me he had managed to get a few pops out of it by putting petrol down the spark plug, so the carb probably just need a clean. And like the naive fool I was I believed him!!

So I stripped the carb and tested the fuel value.

Then I stripped and reassembled the throttle control.


Before you strip down the throttle control it is a good idea to measure the length of the needle from the base of the throttle body, so you know how long it should be when refitting. There is a useful description of a similar carb on www.nsu-greifzu.de/PDF/villiers.pdf

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Quote DevonNewbie Replybullet Posted: 08 Apr 2011 at 10:45pm

After putting some petrol in the tank and many attempts to start it, and not a pop, I decided to take a look at the ignition.


The yellow and green wire was connected to an external addition capacitor and the coil had been "fixed" with glue. I gave it all a good clean up and manage to buy a replacement condenser. Removing the glue showed the true state of the coil. Which I don't think has generated a spark for quite some time.


After looking around for a replacement coil and finding a new coil was going to cost up to 80 I decided to have a go and rewind it myself. Also I thought it would be a good challenge. While the results were not pretty it did generate what look like a healthy spark.


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Quote DevonNewbie Replybullet Posted: 08 Apr 2011 at 10:55pm

After reassembly it still didn't work. I spent many hours trying to set up the timing. I also tried adjusting the needle position in the carb (which I should have note down when I took it to pieces). I could see petrol coming out of the exhaust but the spark plug was dry. Then it dawn on me that it needed some back pressure to prevent the petrol shoots straight out of the exhaust. Unfortunately my exhaust has more holes than a colander. So after covering it with a lot of high temperature tape, it finally started to pop and bang.

But it still didn't run. After my more hours and pulled shoulders I rigged up a drill to start it. After some more trial and error I was able to get it running, but my timing seems to be a mile out from the standard 5/32" before TDC. I can only think the inductance of my coil is different from the original. I am hoping to rewind a new coil I now have a spare, so hopefully I will do a better jobs second time around.

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Quote DevonNewbie Replybullet Posted: 08 Apr 2011 at 11:07pm

While it was still hard to start, it was usable and it has successfully dragged me around to garden a few times. But I noticed that the wheel ratchet springs kept falling off. I must say a big thanks to Chris (Dieselhead) for letting me a have two new springs. Obviously the old ones (on right) were not the correct springs anyway.


When I fitted the new springs I realised the ratchet catches on both wheels were on the right hand side, as you viewed each wheel from the outside. This might explain why it always seems to drag me around the garden in one direction. So on fitting the new springs I moved the catches so they were both closest to the rear. I am not sure if this is right but it made it a little easier to use.

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Quote DevonNewbie Replybullet Posted: 08 Apr 2011 at 11:29pm

While it was usable, just, it was leaking quite a bit of oil from the gear box, so I decided to strip it right down and repaint it. This time remembering to measure the handlebar positions and mark the flywheel position at TDC. I also took copious numbers of photos. I then cleaned it all using a wire brush on a drill and some degreaser. The handlebars were so rusty that I ended up stripping them back to bright metal. I then cover up most of my garage with a couple of tarpaulins before spraying.


The paint I used was two coats of Vapormatic Red Primer and then two coats of Vapormatic John Deere Green.

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Quote DevonNewbie Replybullet Posted: 08 Apr 2011 at 11:39pm

Unfortunately I made the long mistake of trying to respray the scythe in the middle of last winter, which meant I had to wait weeks between coats of paint. Which made the whole process very slow indeed. I am now just starting to put it all back together again.



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Quote DevonNewbie Replybullet Posted: 01 May 2011 at 9:15am

Well I finally managed to put it all back together again last weekend. As my new exhaust hadn't arrived so I had to tape up the old one. Also some of the rivets on the blade had failed so I tried fixing the blade with some pop rivets. The pop rivets did hold for an hour or two but then failed.

I have now painted and fitted the replacement exhaust, which looks a lot better.


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simar kid
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Quote simar kid Replybullet Posted: 06 May 2011 at 8:40pm
very nice.tell me about painting last winter. i was painting simar a 56 and ended up using fast thinners in paint and applied with a brush.
Not sure whats wrong. i think we will let it develop
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Quote Philipagri Replybullet Posted: 07 May 2011 at 7:31am

I'd be interested to know how you rewound the coil, sounds like a useful skill to acquire.
Philip
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Quote will_haggle Replybullet Posted: 07 May 2011 at 8:48am
Have you got an AVO coil winder? We had one at Chippenham College that the students used to wind their transformers on (.... and probably still do!). I had to learn to use it before I could teach that particular skill.....
6 months ago I couldn't even spell engineer - now I are one
Calne, North Wiltshire...
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mowersman
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Quote mowersman Replybullet Posted: 07 May 2011 at 9:29am

Thats a skill I would love to learn one day...

Great looking job on the Allen though.
Andrew
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DevonNewbie
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Quote DevonNewbie Replybullet Posted: 07 May 2011 at 8:43pm

Thanks for all the comments.

Unfortunately the coil winding is not as good as it looks in the photo. I am now sure I have used the wrong gauge for wire for the HT side. As for a winder, no I don't have one. I managed to jam one of the poll ends into a hand drill (not electric). Which I then mounted in a vice. So I very slowly fed the wire with one hand and turned the drill with the other. I now have a second died coil which I intend to dismantle much more carefully, and have another attempt later.

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Quote DevonNewbie Replybullet Posted: 07 May 2011 at 8:58pm

It's a ringer!! The serial number is clearly visible on one side (278335). But when I was reassembling it I noticed the a second erased number on the other side (594 above 1025? from what I can just make out). If anyone has any information regarding the engine serial numbers I would be very interested. Unfortunately the Oxford Allen name plate was missing when I purchased the machine.





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Quote DevonNewbie Replybullet Posted: 23 May 2011 at 2:40pm

Well I have managed to fix the cutter bar. From what I have tried the rivet sizes should be 3/16" by 1/2" for the blade teeth and 3/16" by 7/8" for the spring bracket. I didn't find anyone who could supply 7/8" long rivets so I brought 1" long ones from Chronos and cut them down.

I am not sure how to fit rivets correctly but this is what I did.

I put the new rivet down through the hole with the manufactures dome end on the top of the blade. I then turn over the blade and put the rivet dome into a rivet snap, which was held in a large vice. Using a small hammer I then worked the bottom of the rivet until it formed a tight rivet on the rear side.

I did try putting the manufactured end under the blade, but I was concerned they would catch on the cutter fingers and I think if looks better with the nice dome upper most.

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Quote Charlie Replybullet Posted: 23 May 2011 at 3:51pm
Sounds about right. If the rivet is good and tight then the job is a good'un.
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Quote enginear Replybullet Posted: 23 May 2011 at 8:12pm
Always use the ball end of a ball pein hammer to set rivets the aim is for the end you use the hammer on to be the same as the preformed dome end.
simple
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