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2011 ARCHIVE
 VHGMC ForumsForum Archive2011 ARCHIVE
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owen
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Quote owen Replybullet Topic: Brazing lamp
    Posted: 12 Aug 2011 at 6:50pm
This is a the lamp I mentioned in Chap topic on propane torches , I got it at a local market sale. I cant find any makers names on it, it works like a primus, I tried to fire it up today but I had to abort because of a leak at a pipe joint, didn't want to blow my shed up. I'm thinking it could be thirsty on the paraffin and that's pricey these days. Has anyone on here used one of these or has any information on it. Thanks.
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lawnmowerboy
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Quote lawnmowerboy Replybullet Posted: 12 Aug 2011 at 10:11pm
what @40p a litre!!! havin a laff cheap as muck lad!!!
Grow old, not up!!!
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plonker
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Quote plonker Replybullet Posted: 12 Aug 2011 at 10:59pm
They are ex Army, I have got one, sometimes you can find a date stamp on them , like all army issue goods, the nozzle needs to be very hot in pre warming this thing to get it to work with any efficiency I find.

PS where on earth can you buy paraffin at 40p per litre?, its dearer than petrol in our area!
plonker
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series1gem
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Quote series1gem Replybullet Posted: 12 Aug 2011 at 11:00pm
Originally posted by lawnmowerboy

what @40p a litre!!! havin a laff cheap as muck lad!!!
It seems funny for a whiper snapper to call someone a lad!
When i were a boy petrol was less than that a litre! and theres bound to be some on here who remember a gallon being less.
If it isnt orange it isnt a rotavator
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goldhorse
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Quote goldhorse Replybullet Posted: 12 Aug 2011 at 11:13pm
when I started driving it was 4 shillings and 6 pence a gallon in old money if you went to the Jet garage!
a horse of a different colour
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lawnmowerboy
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Quote lawnmowerboy Replybullet Posted: 13 Aug 2011 at 6:11am
haha i know gareth!!plonker are you buying it in those branded 5 litre cans that are the biggest rip off ever invented at like 7 quid each!!! i ifll up my 5 gallon can for about 12 quid
Grow old, not up!!!
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owen
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Quote owen Replybullet Posted: 13 Aug 2011 at 7:16am
Thanks for your replies, I haven't seen l b's prices down my way. My last 5 litres was 6.75. Being referred to has a lad gave me a short boost, but it didn't last long. I can remember petrol 4 shillings and 11 pence a gallon, which in today's money = just under 25p. So my lad days are long gone.
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enginear
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Quote enginear Replybullet Posted: 13 Aug 2011 at 6:31pm
I would also like to know where LMB can buy legal paraffin at that price.
simple
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Jimmy C
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Quote Jimmy C Replybullet Posted: 14 Aug 2011 at 8:38pm
What makes you say it's a brazing lamp? You would be hard pressed to hold this lamp and a rod for any period of time.
 
 
Regards, Jim.
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lawnmowerboy
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Quote lawnmowerboy Replybullet Posted: 14 Aug 2011 at 10:09pm
total butler in sudbury just over the border in mowersman's land nip in with a couple of cans after one of the private tankers has been in!!!
Grow old, not up!!!
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owen
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Quote owen Replybullet Posted: 15 Aug 2011 at 10:09pm
Originally posted by Jimmy C

What makes you say it's a brazing lamp? You would be hard pressed to hold this lamp and a rod for any period of time.
 
                                                                                                                          
That's a good point Jimmy C, brazing lamp was the general thought of several at the sale. I did prim it up and got it going and after some time it generated some heat. But as you suggested to braze with it would warm me up as well, I wonder what the army used them for.
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Jimmy C
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Quote Jimmy C Replybullet Posted: 16 Aug 2011 at 3:00am
If it had a backpack I'd say urban warfare, They did then and still do throw a tremendous amount of heat, Would you believe "Bridging" On the medium and heavy girder bridges there are large cotter pins that hold the boom, deck and side sections together, Even though there are rollers each side of the gap to help the boom and deck absorb movement, The bridge will twist and contort in a sideways fashion as it takes up the weight imposed upon it.
 
On dismantling of the bridge the cotter pins are a right pig to remove owing to this twisting and contorting, Hence the lamp, The quickest method is to apply heat, Sometimes the pins will require heat in the construction stage.
 
Another purpose for the heat lamp can be seen first hand in countries such as Germany, France, Holland and Belgium, If you visit these countries you will notice that all the bridges of any importance are of painted box steel construction with what appears to be inspection plates at regular intervals along the whole length of the structure, These plates are not there for inspection purposes, They exist for the purpose of either Preliminary or Reserve demolition by NATO forces, Behind each plates is an enclosed cavity and each cavity is designed to carry a pre calculated amount of explosive.
 
Immediately after the second world war there was a danger that Russia would attempt to take control of the whole of Germany, Allied forces and governments however had different ideas as history has foretold, When it came to rebuilding the infrastructure of western Europe, Allied governments where fully aware that whatever they built over natural defences may have to be destroyed again, It was American engineers who came up with the idea of a type of bridge with an inbuilt facility for demolition at the least cost per structure, This is why all the bridges in western Europe look more or less the same, They all have the same facility for destruction, During the cold war NATO was responsible for holding the plans and location of all the bridges in western Europe as well as taking on the responsibility of stockpiling the explosives for each bridge as close as possible to each location, Engineers of each member state had the responsibility of one or more bridges within there area of operation.
 
Over the years these bridges have been painted time and time again, So much so that the nuts on the plates are paint welded fast, When it came to training on these bridges were dummy explosives and dummy cordex was used as part of the briefing it was imperative that some if not all the plates be removed for loading out, The quickest and most practical way of achieving this was to use the heat lamp, Firstly to melt the paint and secondly to expand the nut for easy removal, If I remember correctly the nuts are 48mm.
 
I apologise for the long winded explanation but I wanted not only to explain what they were used for but also under what conditions they were used, Such a violent connection for a seemingly innocent heat lamp, I remember them well, Take care of the one you have.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Regards, Jim.
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owen
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Quote owen Replybullet Posted: 16 Aug 2011 at 6:28pm
Thanks for that information Jimmy C, very interesting. If only this lamp could talk, yes I will look after it.
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Jimmy C
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Quote Jimmy C Replybullet Posted: 16 Aug 2011 at 7:25pm
Just another point about your lamp Owen, They were designed to be soldier proof and tested to a high standard, The safety features incorporated are far superior than that of it's civilian counterpart, Which is smaller, has only one handle and only one non-return valve.
Regards, Jim.
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