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Busman
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Quote Busman Replybullet Posted: 19 Aug 2012 at 5:37pm
Can anyone advise what the thickness should be of a new clutch pad?  Mine look pretty ropey, being worn down to the rivets, so am looking at getting them re-lined.
 
 
 
 
 
Also, the rubber bearing in the pivot end of the arm has completely perished, so need to source a pair of replacements.
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charliesfergy
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Quote charliesfergy Replybullet Posted: 19 Aug 2012 at 8:45pm
I think it is either trustymasseyman or trusty220 that has the contact details for the firm that does clutch shoe relining. Isn't too expensive.
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Busman
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Quote Busman Replybullet Posted: 03 Nov 2012 at 3:50pm
After making enquiries with several HGV garages who do brake relining, I eventually decided to have the clutch shoes relined by Saftek in Cleckheaton, West Yorkshire.  They did an excellent job and were not expensive.
 
 
 
 
Also managed to source a pair of rubber bushes for the clutch shoes.
 
 
Finally managed to get the clutch driver repaired.  Had a blacksmith braze the broken lug back on.
 
 
He did comment on the poor quality of the cast iron.  I have also found this to be the case with the 3 large chain sprockets in the transmission, which once I had cleaned the grease and muck from the splined holes in their centres, this revealed that all three had large air pockets in the cast iron which had been exposed only when the splines had been machined.
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Busman
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Quote Busman Replybullet Posted: 28 Jul 2013 at 6:12pm
The final parts to be cleaned up are the handle bars.  The throttle control was done by a Villiers lever bolted to the right hand bar, but I believe that originally the tractor would have had a twist grip throttle control.  All I have at the moments is a rusty space on the handle bars.
 
 
In the interests of safety, I would prefer a twist grip control.  If anyone has any details as to what the twist grip looks like and how it fits they would be much appreciated.
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Darmic1
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Quote Darmic1 Replybullet Posted: 28 Jul 2013 at 9:48pm
That carb looks very much like an Amal 225/3 without the float bowl section. My Gem project on here has one stripped down. The 90 degree bowl what was fitted if this is indeed a 225/3. Check underneath for the numbers.
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Busman
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Quote Busman Replybullet Posted: 03 Sep 2013 at 6:43pm

Have started reassembling the Trusty, as I need to get the engine mounted so I can measure up the space available for an exhaust and fabricate a mounting bracket for the Burgess air cleaner. Started out by putting the reduction gears together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I turned all the gears around, so that they are now meshing on their unworn tooth faces (thanks for the tip Geoff!!). One of the pinion gears came from my spares donor tractor as the original one was so badly worn, it had teeth which looked like toothpicks!! Strangly though, the opposite side was barely worn, so maybe this had been changed by the previous owner. When putting the axle back together, don’t forget the copper washer which fits between the large gear wheel and bearing, as this spaces the gear wheel away from the outer race of the bearing. Also, when fitting the axle into the housing, make sure that the gear wheel is clear of the inside face of the housing and can rotate freely.

With the reduction gears back together, attention moved on to the countershaft, which is also sourced from the donor tractor, as the original was twisted. The countershaft had to be assembled in situ on the left hand side plate, which I found easier to do with the plate removed from the chassis as the bronze bushes which carry the sprockets were a press fit. I am not entirely sure if this is the correct way to do it, as I had a suspicion that the round plate on the end of the countershaft which carries the brake pulley may have been a separate part pressed/threaded onto the splined shaft. The reason for this thought is that if the countershaft is one single part, there would be a lot of waste material machining down from the large diameter of the end plate to the much smaller diameter of the splined shaft. Needless to say, I didn’t risk trying to separate it!!! I fitted the sprockets and steering dogs the opposite way around to how the were originally fitted, so that they now mesh on the unworn faces.

 

 

 

 

With both side plates and countershaft fitted to the chassis, I next fitted the reduction gear housings. This is really a two person job as they are very heavy and require some joggling about to get the threaded holes in the reduction housing to line up with the holes in the chassis. The parts list I have shows the top fixing for the reduction housing to be 1¼” long, but the top lug on my housings are much thicker and squarer than what is shown, so they need to be about another ½”longer. Between the reduction housing and side plate, there should be a leather gasket to protect the exposed axle bearing. I replaced these with new ones cut from 5mm thick Neoprene rubber sheet using a compass cutter. Once the reduction gear housings were fitted, I bolted on the inner halves of the wheels, just to make it easier for moving the chassis around.

 
 

 

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Charlie
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Quote Charlie Replybullet Posted: 04 Sep 2013 at 8:11am
Some great photos showing how simple the construction of the Trusty is.
'Don't force it! Get a bigger hammer'
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Dieselhead
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Quote Dieselhead Replybullet Posted: 04 Sep 2013 at 9:35pm
Impressive paint jobThumbs%20Up
Chris. I aint getting on no plane. Fool!
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mowersman
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Quote mowersman Replybullet Posted: 09 Sep 2013 at 1:05am
Looking fantastic, you're going to make me regret selling mine.
Andrew
The more I work with petrols, the more I like diesels...
Yeovil, Somerset
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Busman
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Quote Busman Replybullet Posted: 09 Sep 2013 at 6:57pm
Have now fitted the outer sections of the wheels, drive chains and sprockets.
 
 
 
Also attached is the rear end plate with handlebar striker plate and the front plate.
 
 
 
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Busman
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Quote Busman Replybullet Posted: 15 Sep 2013 at 9:48am
Drawbar hitch casting now fitted.
 
 
 
Engine is also now back in it's rightful place, along with the very heavy baseplate that it sits on.
 
 
 
My golf ball textured clutch drum complete with drive sprocket.
 
 
 
Clutch drum reunited with engine and drive chain installed.  What you can't see in this picture is the small spacer I have fitted between the clutch drum and engine in order to stop the sprocket bolt heads from grinding away at the crankcase.
 
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Busman
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Quote Busman Replybullet Posted: 22 Sep 2013 at 6:27pm
Made some new clutch shoe pivot bolts by machining the head down on a 3/8" BSF bolt.
 
 
Added the rubber buffers to the ends of the clutch shoes.  These were made from 7.5mm diameter Nitrile 'O'-ring cord cut down into short lengths and inserted into the holes in the clutch shoes.
 
 
Centrifugal clutch fully assembled.  Make sure you fit the shoes the correct way around, so they are thrown outwards as the clutch spins anticlockwise.
 
 
Clamp bolt which secures the clutch assembly onto the crankshaft.  As you tighten the nut on the other end, the tapered part of the head grips the crankshaft.  Much better than the breakable lugs on the JAP/Douglas engined Trusty's.
 
 
Clutch fitted to engine.  Don't forget to fit the copper washer that sits between the clutch drum and clutch driver, otherwise the clutch assembly can rub against the vertical face of the drum.
 
 
Cooling fan then fits on top of the clutch assembly.  Make sure you don't overtighten the nuts, as this will pinch the clutch shoes in the clutch driver and prevent them from moving.  You can also break the lugs from the clutch driver.  I used 3/8" BSF Nyloc nuts, so there is no risk of them working loose.
 
 
Final job today was to fit the oil tank.  This is a new tank made by Franks Tanks of Howden, East Yorkshire.  It is a perfect match for the original, which was too badly damaged to reuse.  Had hoped to get the oil lines connected up, but found that the original rubber hoses were badly perished, so will need replacing.
 
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