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albertkil
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Quote albertkil Replybullet Topic: atco royale b-30
    Posted: 22 Mar 2013 at 6:12pm
Can anyone tell me the value of these mowers please; I have acquired one but his has no seat
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wristpin
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Quote wristpin Replybullet Posted: 22 Mar 2013 at 7:14pm
Originally posted by albertkil

Can anyone tell me the value of these mowers please; I have acquired one but his has no seat


The basic design for the B30 has been  around around for a long time under various different model names. In the 70s and 80s it was "The Garden 30" presumably to distinguish it from Atco's bigger cylinder mowers of the time "The Heavy Duty 28 and  34" later renamed the Groundsman 28 and 34s
At some point in the 80/90s the Garden name was dropped and it became known just as the B30. At that time it would have had at first a Tecumseh H50 engine and then an H60. Latterly a Briggs engine was fitted with electric start for domestic use and a recoil unit for commercial use. The same basic design exists today under Allett ownership.
The Autosteer trailer seat was always an expensive accessory but was often used as a promotional give away - look how much we are giving you!!!!
Their plus points were being a solid and reliable machine and the minuses a rather snatchy and unforgiving multi-plate clutch and chain drive!
What's it worth  - well what engine have you got ans how much of the blades remain after a lifetime of regrinds? How about posting an image or two?
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Dieselhead
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Quote Dieselhead Replybullet Posted: 22 Mar 2013 at 7:25pm
I sold a seat for one of these last year. I agree with wristpin, horrible clutch.
 
Value is not mutch if you ask me. If I wanted a good cylinder mower then I would buy a ransomes or dennis
Chris. I aint getting on no plane. Fool!
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wristpin
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Quote wristpin Replybullet Posted: 22 Mar 2013 at 8:35pm
Originally posted by Dieselhead

I sold a seat for one of these last year. I agree with wristpin, horrible clutch.
 
Value is not mutch if you ask me. If I wanted a good cylinder mower then I would buy a ransomes or dennis


If we a talking domestic machines The Ransomes Twenty Four was a simple and well built machine other than a lack of greaseable bearings but was quite heavy to use especially with a seat. The Dennis Paragon of the same period never appealed to me either as a user or repairer - there seemed to be a bit of a design issue with the relationship between the cylinder and bottom blade making them difficult to set up/keep in set.  Strange as it may seem my favourite 24" domestic machine of the era was the belt driven  Webb 24. It worked well both in pedestrian and ride on configuration and providing the owner/maintainer was instructed in the proper set up for the belts they provided a reliable and forgiving drive drive train. Unfortunately there were an awful lot of repair shops who just did not understand how to set one up properly resulting in excessive belt wear and unhappy customers.
The chain driven Webb that succeeded it was, in my opinion, a backward step.
Anyway, back to your question of what it's worth - I agree, not a lot, but if you need a 30" grass cutter it will do your job and not cost a lot to maintain. 
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tump
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Quote tump Replybullet Posted: 12 Aug 2013 at 11:25am
Sorry to highjack this old thread, butI am in the process of restoring a Webb 24, and note wristpin's comment about setting up the belts correctly. Can anyone point me in the right direction for this information please?
What if the Hokey Cokey really is what it's all about?
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wristpin
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Quote wristpin Replybullet Posted: 12 Aug 2013 at 12:06pm
Originally posted by tump

Sorry to highjack this old thread, butI am in the process of restoring a Webb 24, and note wristpin's comment about setting up the belts correctly. Can anyone point me in the right direction for this information please?


Easier to explain "in the metal" than in words and I haven't got access to one to take images but I will try to sort out some info and pm it to you.
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wristpin
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Quote wristpin Replybullet Posted: 15 Aug 2013 at 1:36pm
Originally posted by wristpin

Originally posted by tump

Sorry to highjack this old thread, butI am in the process of restoring a Webb 24, and note wristpin's comment about setting up the belts correctly. Can anyone point me in the right direction for this information please?


Easier to explain "in the metal" than in words and I haven't got access to one to take images but I will try to sort out some info and pm it to you.


Only seem to be able to attach to a pm from a hosting site so putting what I have here copied from previous replies on the subject!

If it's a Webb 24 the most common setup problems were,
Incorrect positioning of the belt keeper 19. It is approximately correct as shown and not as so often seen turned inwards to press on the belts. As shown it should be just clear of the belts when the drive is engaged.
Often used to see machines with the outer swinging arm 24 not supporting the tensioning jockey pulley. Belts had been changed, arm dropped down and forgotten about!
Tensioning jockey not free to move properly due to partial seizure of pivot tube just below the fig 20. Should pivot freely round bolt 40. If you detect movement in bolt 40 when operating the clutch lever it is starting to seize.
Tensioning spring 37 and its anchor 38 had to be positioned so that the spring did not rub the inner belt.
Also important that there is a little slack in the clutch cable when engaged and that this is maintained as the belts wear. 1/8" between the moving and fixed parts of the clutch lever before the cable starts to pull.
The clutch levers were made of fairly soft metal (brass?) and would wear so that although you would get full throw and belt disengagement when squeezing the lever you would loose some when the lever was relaxed against the latch with consequent belt drag = smoke and knackered belts! There is a simple fix for this or any other similar lever.
 





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