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enginear
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Quote enginear Replybullet Topic: Rotavator
    Posted: 14 Oct 2013 at 10:15pm
I managed to get a gardenmaster main's electric rotavator has anyone got any detail's about these,ie,when it was made and by who.
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will_haggle
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Quote will_haggle Replybullet Posted: 14 Oct 2013 at 11:38pm
Landmaster made Gardenmasters....
6 months ago I couldn't even spell engineer - now I are one
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pmackellow
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Quote pmackellow Replybullet Posted: 15 Oct 2013 at 1:11pm
Any photos of it enginear ??

Collector of Tarpen, Wheelhorse, International Cub Cadet, Landmaster, Cooper Stewart, Farmfitters, Jobber, Jalo, Ro-lo, Sisis and literature
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wristpin
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Quote wristpin Replybullet Posted: 15 Oct 2013 at 3:56pm
Being really picky / anal it aint a Rotavator - spelt that way it is/was Howard's trademark. As their ad said "if it can't be spelt backwards it's not a ROTAVATOR"
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Quote pmackellow Replybullet Posted: 15 Oct 2013 at 4:29pm
That would be a Palindrome then...

If you could put up a photo enginear I will look in my literature and see if I can help you out.

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Quote wristpin Replybullet Posted: 15 Oct 2013 at 6:17pm
Originally posted by pmackellow

That would be a Palindrome then...



That's the one!
They also did an ad in "mirror writing"
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will_haggle
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Quote will_haggle Replybullet Posted: 16 Oct 2013 at 9:02am
Safety: It's mains, so there's a few checks you must do before plugging in.
Lead, is there any bits of insulation missing or a bit of insulation tape anywhere? Replace whole lead if in doubt.
Plug, Check for cracks, cord grip and fuse and the terminal screws, the earth lead must be the longest, so that it's the last one to pull out. Make sure the pins have insulating sleeves on them.
Entry into the motor, make sure the conductors are connected properly to the terminals and the earth is continuous.
Use a Megger if you have one, if not check earth continuity with a multimeter to check for continuity from the earth pin to the body of the motor.
Remember that old motors can get "leaky" field windings,so it's possible that the casing becomes "live" with 240v!
My Father tested motors by wetting his finger and touching the casing! DON'T DO THAT!!! Him (and me) were pretty immune to mains voltage, you might not be.
Use an RCD, with any luck it will let go before any harm comes to you!
6 months ago I couldn't even spell engineer - now I are one
Calne, North Wiltshire...
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Charlie
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Quote Charlie Replybullet Posted: 16 Oct 2013 at 10:34am
Alternatively let the mother-in-law try it first!!!!
'Don't force it! Get a bigger hammer'
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Philipagri
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Quote Philipagri Replybullet Posted: 16 Oct 2013 at 6:13pm

Accoding to my Cassell's Concise Dictionary  to rotovate and rotovator are indeed the correct English----for the UK
But the North American words are to rotavate and rotavator, so apparently I have always used the American English words, but they are allowed! Big%20smile
Perhaps some of our North American friends would like to comment.
Philip
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series1gem
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Quote series1gem Replybullet Posted: 16 Oct 2013 at 7:27pm
Rotavator was indeed a trademark of Howard's, I'm not sure who owns the name now though.
If it isnt orange it isnt a rotavator
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enginear
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Quote enginear Replybullet Posted: 16 Oct 2013 at 10:13pm
No photo's at present but the id plate has got E10 followed by ser,number,just had a look in my A.Bell book forgot i had it and it state's a late 1970's machine.Will check the electric's,many thank's.
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wristpin
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Quote wristpin Replybullet Posted: 16 Oct 2013 at 11:11pm
Originally posted by will_haggle

Safety: It's mains, so there's a few checks you must do before plugging in.
Lead, is there any bits of insulation missing or a bit of insulation tape anywhere? Replace whole lead if in doubt.
Plug, Check for cracks, cord grip and fuse and the terminal screws, the earth lead must be the longest, so that it's the last one to pull out. Make sure the pins have insulating sleeves on them.
Entry into the motor, make sure the conductors are connected properly to the terminals and the earth is continuous.
Use a Megger if you have one, if not check earth continuity with a multimeter to check for continuity from the earth pin to the body of the motor.
Remember that old motors can get "leaky" field windings,so it's possible that the casing becomes "live" with 240v!
My Father tested motors by wetting his finger and touching the casing! DON'T DO THAT!!! Him (and me) were pretty immune to mains voltage, you might not be.
Use an RCD, with any luck it will let go before any harm comes to you!


All valid stuff but having done the physical checks  why not get it PAT tested?
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enginear
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Quote enginear Replybullet Posted: 17 Oct 2013 at 9:54am
Pat testing is like an MOT and i have done both only valid for the time it has been done,if one left an electric machine out in the rain there is a chance it will cause a shock,most of the electric item's i tested safe have been double insulated,being made of plastic, going back to the MOT i have known people to swap a tyre back that had been borrowed from a mate to get an MOT do's that make it safe.I have got and use an old knibbler and a very big drill both are aluminium and i doubt if either would pass a pat test, that do's not mean i should stop using them.   
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wristpin
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Quote wristpin Replybullet Posted: 17 Oct 2013 at 10:50am
Originally posted by enginear

Pat testing is like an MOT and i have done both only valid for the time it has been done,if one left an electric machine out in the rain there is a chance it will cause a shock,most of the electric item's i tested safe have been double insulated,being made of plastic, going back to the MOT i have known people to swap a tyre back that had been borrowed from a mate to get an MOT do's that make it safe.I have got and use an old knibbler and a very big drill both are aluminium and i doubt if either would pass a pat test, that do's not mean i should stop using them.   


All valid points. Remember that the only way we could get some of the old blue and white electric Flymos through the PAT test was to renew the clear "plastic" motor mounting bushes which were very brittle and prone to cracking . Within an hour of use they would develop hairline cracks and while still performing their mechanical function would fail the PAT.
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will_haggle
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Quote will_haggle Replybullet Posted: 17 Oct 2013 at 12:05pm
Originally posted by enginear

I have got and use an old knibbler and a very big drill both are aluminium and i doubt if either would pass a pat test, that do's not mean i should stop using them.   


I've got some old 1950's electrical tools as well and as long as everything is well earthed you can't go far wrong. I always use an RCD, though!
6 months ago I couldn't even spell engineer - now I are one
Calne, North Wiltshire...
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